The European Alliance on Agricultural knowledge for Development

Agricultural transformation in Africa: the role of smallholder producers

7 December 2016. The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Agriculture and Food for Development (APPG AgDev) hosted Kanayo Nwanze, President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development. Dr Nwanze spoke on “Agricultural transformation in Africa: the role of smallholder producers”.

Kanayo F. Nwanze is President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), which is dedicated to ensuring that governments recognize the concerns of smallholder farmers and other poor rural people. He has been a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Food Security since 2010. He was previously Director-General of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) Africa Rice Center for a decade, where he was instrumental in introducing and promoting New Rice for Africa, or NERICA, a high-yield, drought- and pest-resistant variety developed specifically for the African landscape.

Rory Stewart, Minister of State at DFID, made brief remarks following Dr Nwanze’s address.

Related:
2015, 16 pages

A UK Parliamentary Report exploring how to support and scale up smallholder agribusiness development in sub-Saharan Africa, on behalf of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Agriculture and Food for Development.

Background:

The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Agriculture and Food for Development (APPG AgDev) facilitates informed debate on food, agriculture and nutrition in the UK Parliament and engages with DFID, other donors and national governments on these issues. Chaired by Jeremy Lefroy MP and Lord Cameron of Dillington the APPG AgDev is a cross-party initiative that brings together parliamentarians concerned with enhancing agriculture, nutrition and food security in developing countries. The APPG AgDev’s vision is for the UK government to champion agriculture as a development priority and be a global leader in supporting smallholder farming in developing countries.


Source: PAEPARD FEED

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